Indiana

DeShawn Dumas

The ballistic monochromes of DeShawn Dumas reveal invisible forms of power and domination while challenging the anti-representational history of 20th century monochromatic painting. These conceptual works use violent methods of repetitive dishonor: burning, tearing, shooting, and smashing laminated glass panels as metaphor for the afterlives of slavery, if not the crises of the 21st century.

As the artist states himself, “Western democracy has proven unable or unwilling to form an ethical, humane and inclusive society beyond the spectacle of screen culture and vapid consumerism." Dumas’ art like the spectacle itself works precisely at the level of subjectivity. The spectacle packages the consumption of violence in ways which divorce domination and suffering from ethical considerations, historical understanding and political contextualization. To the contrary, Dumas explains “my work concerns social death, particularly,...

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Biography

The ballistic monochromes of DeShawn Dumas reveal invisible forms of power and domination while challenging the anti-representational history of 20th century monochromatic painting. These conceptual works use violent methods of repetitive dishonor: burning, tearing, shooting, and smashing laminated glass panels as metaphor for the afterlives of slavery, if not the crises of the 21st century.

As the artist states himself, “Western democracy has proven unable or unwilling to form an ethical, humane and inclusive society beyond the spectacle of screen culture and vapid consumerism." Dumas’ art like the spectacle itself works precisely at the level of subjectivity. The spectacle packages the consumption of violence in ways which divorce domination and suffering from ethical considerations, historical understanding and political contextualization. To the contrary, Dumas explains “my work concerns social death, particularly, all those who lack the economic power, social visibility, lethal and ideological force to defend against the nightmare that is Western civilization.”

Artworks

1

Black Boy Fly, 2018

RELATED CATEGORIES

Abstract Expression / Consumerism / Contemporary Society / Glass / Human Rights / Invisible Energy / Laminated Glass / Monochrome / Power / Social Inequality / Social Issues / Subjectivity / Western Civilization

CURRICULUM VITAE

Education

  • 2015

    MFA/MA, Pratt Institute, New York, NY

  • 2007

    BFA, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Black Light, Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, CA

  • 2017

    Holocene Extinction, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • 2013

    Future Primitive, Janet Kurnatowski, Brooklyn, NY

Group Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Fears of Art, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York

  • 2018

    Volta 14, Ethan Cohen Gallery, Basel, Switzerland

  • Introductions 2018, Trestle Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

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Curriculum Vitae

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Education

  • 2015

    MFA/MA, Pratt Institute, New York, NY

  • 2007

    BFA, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Black Light, Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, CA

  • 2017

    Holocene Extinction, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • 2013

    Future Primitive, Janet Kurnatowski, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2011

    Say whatever you Like…Just Obey, East One Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2009

    People as Shapes, Aeon Logic Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

Group Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Fears of Art, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York

  • 2018

    Volta 14, Ethan Cohen Gallery, Basel, Switzerland

  • Introductions 2018, Trestle Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2017

    Art Miami, Ethan Cohen Gallery, Miami, FL

  • Orphans of Painting, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • Art Remixed, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • The Future is Abstract, Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts and Culture, Charlotte, NC

  • 2016

    Different Americans, Podgorica, Montenegro

  • Neo-Icon, Dukley Art Center, Kotor, Montenegro

  • I saw a rib, Hozhoni Gallery, Flagstaff, AZ

  • 2015

    Context Art Miami, Ethan Cohen Gallery, Miami, FL

  • In The Cloud, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • Paintings in Trees, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2014

    BBBBBreeze, Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

  • Ten-year anniversary celebration, Janet Kurnatowski, Brooklyn, NY

  • Triangles, Ventana 244, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2013

    Paperazzi, Janet Kurnatowski Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2012

    objects in the mirror are closer than they appear, Kravets/Wehby Gallery, New York, NY

  • Pushing Painting Paradigms, curated by LaToya Ruby Frazier, Rutgers University

  • Materiality, ED. VARIE, New York, NY

  • Summer Snacks, Janet Kurnatowski Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2011

    The Pratt Harlem Project, New York, NY

  • View from the top, WIndows Gallery, New York, Ny

  • 2010

    Abstract Lands, Paula Barr Gallery, New York

  • 2009

    Inspirational leaders, Aeon Logic Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

  • 2007

    BFA Thesis Exhibition, Bloomington, IN

Lecture

  • AICAD Postgraduate Teaching Fellow at San Francisco Art Institute (2017-2019)

  • Pratt Institute, Guest Lecturer, Brooklyn NY (2015)

  • School of Visual Arts, Guest Lecturer, New York NY (2013-2014)

Bibliography

  • 2013

    Cameron Brinitzer, “DeShawn Dumas: Interview” painters-table.com

  • Mary Negro, “The World isn’t a monochrome: In the studio with DeShawn Dumas,” artcritical.com

  • Howard Hurst, “No One Likes a Sunday,” hyperallergic.com

  • 2012

    Polistena, Joyce, “Straining for Order Out of Chaos: the Paintings of DeShawn Lamar Dumas,” A symposium Faith, Identity, and History: Representations of Christianity in Modern and Contemporary African-American Art Philadelphia Museum of Fine Art/Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art

  • 2011

    Quagliata Gail “You Can Talk About Whatever You Like Whenever or Wherever you Like Just Obey,” prattsuccess.com