Belgrad, 1935 - 2019

Vladimir Veličković

Vladimir Veličković first moved from Belgrade to Zagreb to take up a position in the State’s studio, led by Krsto Hegedusic. By the early 1960s he had defined his oeuvre, his artistry vividly influenced by the war torn environment the young man was raised in. His sharp and defined lines depicting torn bodies of humans and animals was a definition that was later to become a signature. This formation composes tormented figurations, often of men facing violent situations. These situations he deems as a “harsh reality”, nevertheless a reality that he believes strongly that is not to be shied away from. The figurations also include animals, which can be seen as symbolic representations and express a deep understanding of philosophy. Furthermore, the symbols echo the division caused by a culture...

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Biography

Vladimir Veličković first moved from Belgrade to Zagreb to take up a position in the State’s studio, led by Krsto Hegedusic. By the early 1960s he had defined his oeuvre, his artistry vividly influenced by the war torn environment the young man was raised in. His sharp and defined lines depicting torn bodies of humans and animals was a definition that was later to become a signature. This formation composes tormented figurations, often of men facing violent situations. These situations he deems as a “harsh reality”, nevertheless a reality that he believes strongly that is not to be shied away from. The figurations also include animals, which can be seen as symbolic representations and express a deep understanding of philosophy. Furthermore, the symbols echo the division caused by a culture all too familiar to the artist. Effectively this culture is remembered today, although no longer idolized, the artist ensures the effects of these ideologies are not forgotten. Owed to these layers of philosophical and aesthetical mastery the artist became renown for and that would later set him apart from his peers.

In 1963, the Museum of Modern Art in Belgrade held his first ever-solo exhibition. Representing the former Kingdom of Yugoslavia, the architect from Belgrade was awarded first prize for painting at the (“Biennale des Jeunes”) 1965 Paris Biennale. With this success the artist achieved public acclaim and subsequently relocated to the city that is still regarded to this day as the centre of the art world. He received international recognition along with two other notable artists from Yugoslavia, “Dado” and “Lubja”.

The Galerie du Dragon, in Paris exhibited his artworks in 1967 by which time his work had already begun to be revered by academic scholars and respected art critics. He became a leading figure of the Narrative figuration art movement, a movement that returned figurative artwork to the forefront in Paris. By 1983 and until the year 2000, Vladimir Veličković took the position of professor at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris and was later elected at the Academy of Fine Art in 2005. Meanwhile in 1998, he was appointed the rank of Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters, which notifies his significant contribution to French cultural heritage. Finally, the Knighthood of the Legion of Honor – the highest decoration in France – was awarded to him in 2007.

Although for Veličković, Paris was merely a professional, geographic displacement. The city certainly has suited him. A senior, established artist and member of the Serbian Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has always felt close to Belgrade, his home and praises his native city, observing its slow and steady progress. In his seniority, Veličković towers over both Paris and Belgrade, with one foot in central Europe and another in the Eastern block, always retaining stability.

One could say the artist’s work is a ‘reconnoitre’ of dynamic figuration, both human and animal forms, seemingly shifting through un-see-able dimensions. Barren landscapes play host to the Veličković’s reality of violence. Torn bodies faced with their aggressors, confronting symbolic animal figures, wrestling with the impending terror that is ever-present, always painted with muted hues of grey black and red, a palette of which acts to emphasize a desired level of turmoil and recognition.

Questioning the direction of Western painting, in the wake of cubism, for approximately half a century, Veličković began to pursue retribution to the absence of the human figure. As a kind of propitiation to ancient tradion his artistry seems to pay homage and yet never fully submits itself to academia.

Artworks

14

Body, 2013

Related Categories

21st Century Art / Animals/Birds/Insects / Art of the 2010s / Belgrade / Bold Composition / Canvas / Dreamlike Imagery / Figurative Painting / Gentle and Smooth Brushstrokes / Human Nature/Existence / Individual and Society / Ink / Ink on Paper / Memories / Narrative Figuration Art Movement / Oil on Canvas / Oil Paint / Oil Painting / Painting / Paris / Raven / Serbia / The Grotesque / Trauma / Traumatic Experience / Violence / War/Military / Works on Paper / Zagreb

Curriculum Vitae

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2019

    A2Z Gallery, Hong Kong

  • 2018

    Rima Gallery, Kragujevac

  • Cristel Galley, Saint-Malo

Collections

  • Museum Collections

  • Amsterdam - Stedelijk Museum 

  • Anglet - Museum of Contemporary Art 

Bibliography

  • Max Clarac-Sérou. Velickovic / drawing 1972-1973, Paris : editions of the Dragon, « Cahier du Dragon n° 1 », 1973, unpaginated. (An original drawing and an etching)

  • Jean-Louis Ferrier (collective project directed by). Vladimir Velickovic, Paris : Pierre Belfond, 1976, 215 p.

  • Marc Le Bot. Vladimir Velickovic, Essay on Artistic Symbolism, Paris : Galilée publishing , 1979, 259 p.

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Curriculum Vitae

The artist CV shows the details after 2000s.
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Solo Exhibitions

  • 2019

    A2Z Gallery, Hong Kong

  • 2018

    Rima Gallery, Kragujevac

  • Cristel Galley, Saint-Malo

  • Thalberg Gallery, Zürich

  • Anne Marie and Roland Pallade Gallery, Lyon

  • 2017

    Rima Gallery, Belgrade 

  • Envy Fine Art, Beijing

  • 2015

    1700 La Poste Gallery, Montreal

  • Artrial Gallery, Perpignan

  • Hospice Saint Roch Museum, Issoudun

  • Grafički Kolektiv Gallery, Belgrade

  • Art 55 Gallery, Nis

  • 2014

    Jane Griffiths Gallery, Val d’Isère

  • Rima Gallery, Kragujevac

  • Anne Marie and Roland Pallade Gallery, Lyon

  • Nicole Buck Gallery, Strasbourg

  • 2013

    Ana Tschopp Gallery, Marseille

  • Gallery of the Academy of Art and Science, Belgrade

  • Zepter Museum, Belgrade

  • André Malraux, Center of Contemporary Art, Colmar

  • Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rijeka

  • Biennale of Printmaking, Varna

  • 2012

    National Museum of Fine Art, Havana

  • Museum of Modern Art, Slovengradec

  • Palazzo Millesi, Split

  • 2011

    Nev Gallery, Ankara 

  • DX Gallery, Bordeaux 

  • Anna Tschopp Gallery, Marseille

  • Salon d’Art Gallery, Brussels

  • Samantha Sellem Gallery(with Dado), Paris

  • The Abattoirs, Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Toulouse

  • 2010

    Contemporary drawing Salon, Paris

  • Samantha Sellem Gallery, Paris

  • Art on Paper, Brussels

  • Éphémère Museum, Montélimar

  • Center for Contemporary Art, Eysines

  • Anne Marie and Roland Pallade Gallery, Lyon

  • Juraj Sporer Gallery, Opatija

  • Rima Gallery, Kragujevac 

  • 2009

    Daniel Duchoze Gallery, Rouen

  • Maison Elsa Triolet Louis Aragon, Saint-Arnoult-en-Yvelines

  • Ekfrasi Gallery, Athens

  • Art Gallery, Belgrade

  • Lucien Schweitzer Paris Art Gallery, Paris

  • 2008

    Antonio Prates Gallery, Lisbon

  • Ernst Hilger Gallery, Vienna

  • Lucien Schweitzer Gallery, Luxembourg

  • Nicole Buck Gallery, Strasbourg

  • Samantha Sellem Gallery, Paris

  • 2007

    Lillebonne Gallery, Nancy

  • L’Arc Scène Nationale Theater, Le Creusot 

  • Frédéric Stormel Gallery, Lille

  • Anne Marie and Roland Pallade Gallery, Lyon

  • 2006

    Sellem Gallery, Paris 

  • Daniel Duchoze Gallery, Rouen

  • Anna Tschopp Gallery, Marseille

  • Villa Beatrix Enea and Georges-Pompidou Gallery, Anglet

  • la Hune Brenner Gallery, Paris

  • 2005

    éphémère Museum, Montélimar

  • Juaye-Mondaye Abbaye Premonstratensian house 

  • Castello di Arceto, Reggio Emilia

  • Prince Palace, Reggio Emilia

  • 2004

    Ekfrasi Gallery, Athens

  • Confluence(s) Gallery, Lyon

  • M’ARS Gallery, Moscow

  • 2003

    Marlborough Fine Art, London

  • Le Garage Gallery, Toulouse

  • Lucien Schweitzer Galerie, Luxembourg

  • Marwan Hoss Gallery, Paris

  • Antonio Prates Gallery, Lisbon

  • Center for Art and Literature, L’Echelle (Ardennes)

  • The Temple, Chauray (Deux-Sèvres)

  • 2002

    Gallery of Academy of Science and Art, Belgrade

  • Forni Gallery, Bologne

  • 2001

    Ekfrasi Gallery, Athens

Collections

  • Museum Collections

  • Amsterdam - Stedelijk Museum 

  • Anglet - Museum of Contemporary Art 

  • Aosta - Regional Council of Aosta Valley 

  • Arles - Vincent Van Gogh Foundation 

  • Athens - Pinacothèque Nationale (Art Gallery) 

  • Athens- Frissiras Museum 

  • Belgrade - Museum of Contemporary Art 

  • Belgrade - National Museum 

  • Belgrade - Gallery of the Academy of Art and Science 

Bibliography

  • Max Clarac-Sérou. Velickovic / drawing 1972-1973, Paris : editions of the Dragon, « Cahier du Dragon n° 1 », 1973, unpaginated. (An original drawing and an etching)

  • Jean-Louis Ferrier (collective project directed by). Vladimir Velickovic, Paris : Pierre Belfond, 1976, 215 p.

  • Marc Le Bot. Vladimir Velickovic, Essay on Artistic Symbolism, Paris : Galilée publishing , 1979, 259 p.

  • Alain Gutharc, Alin Avila, Vladimir Velickovic. Velickovic, Paris : Editions of Different Art, 1983, 111 p.

  • Alin Avila, Claude Bricage (photos). Vladimir Velickovic : Atelier, Paris : area editions, 1986, unpaginated.

  • Miodrag B. Protić, Zoran Kržišnik, Ješa Denegri, Marc Le Bot, Danilo Kiš. Vladimir Veličković, Belgrade : éditions Prosveta – Književne Novine et Ljubljana : Mladinska Knjiga edition, 1986, 224 p.

  • Irina Subotić. Vladimir Veličković, Belgrade : Gallery Graphic Collective, 1987, 64 p. bilingual edition, Serbian / French

  • Vladimir Velickovic. Homme de Muybridge, 24 variations, Paris : area editions, 1987, unpaginated 

  • André Velter. Velickovic, The Terror and The Wind, Montpellier : Fata Morgana, 1987, 91 p. 

  • Théodore Blaise. Vladimir Velickovic, Movements, Paris : area edition, 1988, unpaginated.