Oslo, 1925 - 2019

Aase Texmon Rygh

Aase Texmon Rygh is considered a pioneer of Norwegian Modernist sculpture. She was educated at the Norwegian National Academy of Art in 1944 - 46 and at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in 1948 - 49. Central to the artist’s oeuvre is an exploration of what Texmon Rygh calls ‘form principles’, and the balance between formal expression and the properties of the material. These explorations began early on; over the early years, her style moved rapidly towards further simplification and abstraction, where variations of geometric and symbolically charged forms – like the yin and yang shape, and especially the Möbius strip – recur in numerous varieties. For Texmon Rygh, these forms hold interest as expressions of cosmic and mathematical principles, and as such the deep forces...

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Biography

Aase Texmon Rygh is considered a pioneer of Norwegian Modernist sculpture. She was educated at the Norwegian National Academy of Art in 1944 - 46 and at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in 1948 - 49. Central to the artist’s oeuvre is an exploration of what Texmon Rygh calls ‘form principles’, and the balance between formal expression and the properties of the material. These explorations began early on; over the early years, her style moved rapidly towards further simplification and abstraction, where variations of geometric and symbolically charged forms – like the yin and yang shape, and especially the Möbius strip – recur in numerous varieties. For Texmon Rygh, these forms hold interest as expressions of cosmic and mathematical principles, and as such the deep forces of nature and man.

Texmon Rygh’s series of Möbius sculptures is based on a geometric phenomenon discovered by the nineteenth-century German mathematician August Ferdinand Möbius: in essence, a strip is held firm at one end and rotated once around itself, before the two ends of the strip are joined together, thus creating an infinity loop.

Texmon Rygh creates these sculptures in bronze as well as in stone. She has made not only single Möbius strips, but also double and triple ones, some lying and some standing, as shown in this image. She refines the form by rotating the sculpture and adding additional loops. These sculptural variations are complex, with extra dimensions of spatiality. The viewer is challenged to capture the form by moving around it, while the sculpture reveals its many twists and turns, though without any beginning or end – they are infinite forms.

Until her death this spring, Texmon Rygh stayed active as an artist and in recent years her work has received increasing national and international recognition. In 2001 she was appointed a Knight, First Class of the Order of St. Olav, and in 2012 she was represented at the dOCUMENTA exhibition of international contemporary art in Kassel, Germany. In 2016 she was included in Skulptur i Pilane, Sweden, and in October 2016 the Norwegian National Museum of Art opened the traveling solo exhibition Evighetens form.

Artworks

2

Möbius dobbel, 1993

Related Categories

20th Century Art / Abstract Sculpture / Abstraction / Art after World War II / Art of the 1970s / Art of the 1980s / Art of the 1990s / Artists of All Time / Balance and Harmony / Balanced Composition / Bronze / Concrete Art Movement / European Art / Geometric Abstraction / Geometric Forms / Human and Nature / Multidisciplinary Approach / Norway / Norwegian Art / Restrained Expression / Space/Spatiality

Curriculum Vitae

Selected Group Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Cutting Edges: Nordic Concrete Art from the Erling Neby Collection, Scandinavia House, New York, NY

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Curriculum Vitae

The artist CV shows the details after 2000s.
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Selected Group Exhibitions

  • 2019

    Cutting Edges: Nordic Concrete Art from the Erling Neby Collection, Scandinavia House, New York, NY